Fish as art

Second in a series of two

So, yes, I’ll get through one more day in confinement by sharing the few pics of fish that were reasonably successful. (I am curious though as to what I would have experienced by the time this post appears in December of 2021.)

 

 

 

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

December, 2021

 

My photographs, published by RotsWolk Publishers

 

Fish as art

First in a series of two 

I write this post a year before it will appear (18.11.20).  This comes as a result of nearing the end of the strangest of years 2020, not the most difficult, but distinctly odd  –  a year in which you hesitate to go for a walk because you might be caught and fined, a year in which I can count on one hand with fingers to spare the times I have gone further than my immediate neighbourhood, times when I greeted people with my elbow.  Thus, in this time, I went back, sifting through my archive of photographs.  I came across my visit to the Aquarium at the Waterfront in Cape Town.  Most of my pics were an out-of-focus mess, but some, I think, were reasonable.  I share them.

 

 

 

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

December, 2021

 

My photographs, published by RotsWolk Publishers, Cape Town

 

 

“Summertime”

Time magazine did not rate Summertime as the greatest song of the 20th-century, but they might have.  It was written in 1934 with the music by George Gershwin.  It is said that Ira Gershwin also contributed to the melody.  The lyrics were written by DuBose Heyward on whose novel the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess was based and where Summertime is sung.  Since that time the cover versions of the song have multiplied and the statistics have reached the Guinness Book of Records.  Many jazz musicians have performed and recorded the song and for my taste the version that culminates this history is that of the rock group Big Brother and the Holding Company with the singer Janis Joplin.  If music has ever been vein-splitting in intensity, then this is it.

The music most appropriately suggests blues structures, specifically southern folk spiritual lullabies, with the gentle bass vamp.  The lyrics are in my opinion profound.  With lines suffused by seering irony, the mother finds comfort somewhere and sings her baby to sleep

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy

Fish are jumpin’ and the cotton is high 

Yo’ daddy’s rich, and yo’ mama’s good-looking

So hush, little baby, don’t you cry

 

One of these mornin’s you gonna rise up singing

spread yo’ wings and reach for the sky

but until that mornin’ nothing’s gonna harm you

With Daddy and Mammy standin’ by

 

And the melody climbs through the gentle vamp as if it is spreading wings.  It is a song of hope amidst abject poverty and hopelessness.  It is my number one.

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

November, 2021

 

Source

Wikipedia “Summertime”

 

My graphics, published by RotsWolk Publishers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ste Jeanne d’Arc Cathedral, Nice

Third in a series of three

The Cathedral with its deep historical roots was also a masterpiece of deco design.

 

 

 

 

There must be very few buildings in the world that have a design with this depth of vision.  The woman at the tourist office told me that the building is not popular amongst the Nicoise  –  they call it meringue on account of its colour and the cupolas.  Perhaps she doesn’t know much of the history of architecture.  As I have said, this is a monument in the history of the architecture of the sacred with implications for contemporary spirituality.

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

November, 2021

 

My photographs, published by RotsWolk Publishers

Ste Jeanne d’Arc Cathedral, Nice

Second in a series of three

Despite the modernist minimalism in the art work of the cathedral, there was much to see.  In 1934, Eugene Klementoff painted the Stations of the Cross as murals, another departure from tradition.  This work was influenced, they say, by Russian cubism, the Italian quattrocento and by Byzantine icons.  I found these paintings as novel as they were moving.

 

 

 

 

There were a number of sculptures, also in an entirely uncluttered mileiu.

Three angels

 

Figure of Christ

 

Christ in blessing

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

November, 2021

 

My photographs, published by RotsWolk Publishers

 

Ethiopian art in the church

Ste Jeanne d’Arc Cathedral, Nice

First in a series of three

My visit to the Jeanne d’Arc Cathedral in Nice was something of a quantum leap –  backwards in time, forwards in time.  Perhaps because I’m not Catholic I don’t understand why they call this place an eglise (church) rather than a cathedrale.  Maybe it has to do with something as hum-drum as administration.

From the moment I saw the first signs of the building, a startling white, I knew this would an experience vastly different from my other visits to churches and cathedrals.  The architect, Jacques Droz, was determined to depart from standard designs and his designs were ready as early as 1914, in the heart of the modernist awakening.  In so doing, he laid the foundation for the remarkable changes that would happen in the decades to come as regards the architecture of the sacred.  I think of Le Corbusier’s Chapelle Ronchamp in the 1950s.  Construction for Droz’s work began in 1926 and was complete in 1931.

From the entrance …

 

… to arches of the interior I found it impressive.

 

These arches must be between three and four storeys high.  They are neither Romanesque nor Gothic.  They recall Byzantian design.  It is said that Droz was working on a Mediterranean idiom, drawing on an architectural history far older than most of the architecture of Europe.  I find this appropriate in Provence and in particular in the city of Nice.   Outside, these arches manifest as cupolas and the influence of North African style is more apparent.

At a distance, I was reminded of the Sacre Coeur, Monmartre in Paris, a 19th-century building which also broke from Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque and Neo-Classic traditions.

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

October, 2021

 

Sources

Wikipedia – L’Eglise Jeanne d’Arc, Sacre Coeur

 

Images

My photographs

 

Rabiac cemetery, Antibes

Second in a series of two

The tastes are various.  I’m not sure how I would feel if my family and friends presented me for my burial with some of the decorations on graves that I saw at Rabiac.  If you look carefully at the grave below, you see which instrument the loved one played in the band.

 

 

A big heart to show love.  I think that dagger is actually a cross.

 

Just decorative.

 

Elaborate and touching

As bizarre as this is for my taste, there is a great sadness here.  

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

October, 2021

 

My photographs

 

This was the conveyor for dead leaves in the cemetery

Rabiac Cemetery, Antibes

First in a series of two

I’m not sure why graveyards and cemeteries have a curious attraction for me.  It is perhaps the profound implication of history  –  we human beings are the only species with outward signs of caring for our past and for our dead.  A cemetery is the great stamp of the past.  Then too, as is the case with Cemetiere de Rabiac that I came upon by accident, there are the intriguing and even startling ways in which gravestones have been decorated.  In the case of Rabiac there are some famous people buried there.  There is also the complex history of France.

 

Some graves with fresh flowers;  some in advanced decay

The universal monument to the world wars.

 

And then it is interesting to see how times have changed.  At Rabiac, there are quite a few Muslim graves.  One wonders whether that could happen today.

 

 

And yes, in death we are all equal.

 

The late -1950s brought a war between France and Algeria.  Some Arabic people wanted France to continue governing Algeria, but colonialism was nearing its end and when France eventually withdrew those who had sided with them, the Harkis, fled to France where their descendants have been since.

Here is the plaque for the Harkis at Rabiac.

 

Here is the bronze monument.

 

Rabiac is a 19th-century cemetery and there are monument chapels for certain families.

 

I’ve left the more bizarre (?) gravestones for next week.

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

October, 2021

 

My photographs

 

 

In the nick of the camera lens

The photographer has to think and move in fragments of a second, as the dice fall, to catch the image. I have collected a few comic images which I have had for longer than I can remember. So I am grateful that photographers are often the ones that make for the fugitive smile that we need.

 

 

 

 

 

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

October, 2021

 

Sources

Cat and eagle – clipboard

I’m afraid I don’t have the sources of the other images.

 

Pastor Venter of the Corpus Christie Church was not aware that the “Pa” had fallen off the noticeboard.  I sent the photograph to him asking if he had been upgraded to a saint.  He didn’t respond. 

 

 

Les Semboules just because

Second in a series of two

Amazing what one randomly finds in a neighbourhood …

The stained glass windows of a small modern church in the vicinity.

 

Every need met, within walking distance from the apartment …

 

Cement relief work, one of a series, near the bus stop.

 

Born under an African sun, I thrust my hand into the snow when it falls.

 

Saturday morning vegetable market on the parking lot near the apartment blocks

 

An onion that was neglected on our vegetable rack in the kitchen.

 

Lion and cypress

 

©  Will

http://www.willwilltravel.wordpress.com

Les Semboules, Antibes

October, 2021

 

My photographs 

 

Sunrise from the lounge window

 

 

 

 

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